Accreditation

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Accreditation 

The Redmond Police Department continues to retain its accredited status with the Oregon Accreditation Alliance (OAA). In November 2010, an assessment was conducted of the department by the OAA and passed with flying colors.

During the 2011 Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police spring conference in McMinnville, the OAA awarded the accreditation certificate to Interim Chief Dave Tarbet and Officer April Huey. Officer Huey was the accreditation manager ensuring the department continues to meet standards outlined by the OAA.

The agency first became accredited in November of 2000 by the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC); joining only 5 other accredited Oregon agencies. On September 11th, 2001 an assessment team from OAA conducted an on-site evaluation of the Redmond Police Department and recommended an accreditation award be granted. On October 5th, 2001 the Redmond Police Department became the first agency to earn an accreditation award from the newly formed OAA. At about the same time, the OAA became an alliance partner with CALEA, enabling the Redmond Police Department to earn a recognition award from that auspicious body - the first in the nation as a result of an alliance award.

In October 2004 the Redmond Police Department received its second recognition from CALEA. In January 2005 Redmond became the first Oregon agency to be re-accredited by the OAA. The number of accredited agencies in Oregon grows every year. The Redmond Police Department is committed to assisting the approximately 40 other Oregon law enforcement agencies pursuing accreditation through the Oregon Accreditation Alliance.

Accreditation is a process through which an agency, such as Redmond Police Department, opens its doors and bares its policies and procedures for review. The process is an opportunity for the agency to show that they meet nationally recognized professional standards of conduct and procedure. The assessment of the agency's state of affairs is conducted by independent assessors trained in the application of the standards. Accreditation award is proof that the agency meets these standards of professional conduct.

Accreditation benefits an agency in terms of potentially reduced liability insurance costs, stronger defense against lawsuits and civil complaints, greater accountability within the agency, support from government officials, increased community advocacy, and recognition for excellence. Most importantly, it enhances an agency's ability to successfully apprehend and prosecute people who engage in criminal behavior and endanger the citizens of the community.